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Convention on Biological Diversity

Höft R. and Yifru W. (2017), "Convention on Biological Diversity", eLS, 1–5.
Abstract: The Convention on Biological Diversity is the key global instrument on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits from the use of genetic resources. Through a globally agreed target aimed to reduce the loss of biodiversity the Convention promotes the maintenance of healthy ecosystems, the protection of threatened species and the conservation of the genetic material that underpins populations of wild and domesticated species. Increasingly, nongovernmental organizations, civil society groups and indigenous and local communities work through the Convention to urge countries to live up to their commitments and to support them, for example in the establishment and effective management of protected area networks. As population growth and economic pressures enlarge humanity's ecological footprint it remains to be seen whether the Convention is an effective tool for conserving the beauty, diversity and inspiring nature of our living environment for future generations to enjoy.  

Cooper D. and Noonan-Mooney K. (2013), "Convention on Biological Diversity", Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Second Edition), Amsterdam: Elsevier, 306-319.
Abstract: The Convention on Biological Diversity is the key international treaty for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity and for the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the use of genetic resources. 192 countries, and the European Union (EU), are Party to the Convention. In 2010, a new Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 with 20 outcome-oriented Aichi Biodiversity Targets was adopted. The Convention is implemented primarily through national action. There is a need to address the pressures on biodiversity and the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity across government and society.